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Going organic can do wonders for your personal health and that of the planet's - but like with any seemingly good-doing trend, there are a few things to be mindful of before making the switch. Here's the lowdown - 

DON'T BUY INTO DECEPTIVE MARKETING

The words green, natural and organic get thrown about left right and centre nowadays, but not all of these products will be certified. Make sure your product is certified by the Soil Association.

Be aware however, that in order for a product to have the official organic stamp, 70 percent of its ingredients has to be organic. That sounds like a lot, but you should still be careful about the remaining 30 percent - check the rest of the ingredients, if there's anything on there that seems incomprehensible, you're probably best putting it back on the shelf. Ingredients to avoid include parabens, fragrances, and GMOs.

ORGANIC DOESNT ALWAYS MEAN HEALTHY

Just because a product is considered to be organic, it doesn't mean that it’s completely pesticide-free. The vetting process for organic foods isn't 100% foolproof either. Inspectors can perform audits without necessarily having to test the produce or the soil used to grow them. Do your research - find out how these organic farmers and manufacturers protect their produce and materials from contamination, and what their inspection process involves.

KEEP IT COST EFFECTIVE

Switching to 100% organic can be a costly process. If you want to prioritise your organic purchases and avoid produce with the most amount of pesticides, here's a list of the dirty / clean dozen from the Environmental Working Group - 

 

12 Most Contaminated

Peaches

Apples

Sweet Bell Peppers

Celery

Nectarines

Strawberries

Cherries

Pears

Grapes

Spinach

Lettuce

Potatoes

 

12 Least Contaminated

Onions

Avocado

Sweet Corn (Frozen)

Pineapples

Mango

Asparagus

Kiwi Fruit

Bananas

Cabbage

Broccoli

Papaya

 

Happy Shopping!


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